Images in Growing up Jewish in Colorado

Bernstein Family at Seven Falls, Colorado

Mrs. Moritz Bernstein, her son and daughter and an unidentified woman ride on burros in front of the waterfalls at Seven Falls, Colorado Springs, Colorado, during a tour. Mrs. Bernstein's other son stands behind the group beside a fake elk. All five of the men and women are wearing hats. Moritz Bernstein had a dry goods store in Walsenburg, Colorado, where the family lived and in other southern Colorado towns.

Click here to view this image in the Peak Digital Beck Archives Photograph Collection

Sunday School Class and Teachers of Sons of Israel Synagogue

Four adults and twenty-two children sit on the steps of the Sons of Israel Synagogue. Congregation Sons of Israel was in Colorado Springs organized in 1903. Pictured here are members of the Hebrew School with their teachers. Standing second from the left is May Myers and third from left is May Margaret Golin. Fourth from left on first row is Rosalie June Golin (Kobey). Second row, left is Loretta Edith Golin (Gass) and third from left is Augusta Gertrude Golin (Meyer).

Daughters of Harris and Leah Sheffel Kobey

Formal portrait of the daughters of Harris and Leah Sheffel Kobey. The Kobey sisters are from left to right: Rebecca, 11 years old, Ruth, 5 months old and Dorothy, 5 years old.

Click here to view this image in the Peak Digital Beck Archives Photograph Collection

Miriam Rachofsky Kobey and Grandchildren Hannah Shwayder Berry

Miriam Rachofsky Kobey and her grandchildren (from left to right, Rebecca, Miriam holding Silas, Philip, and Leon) pose in front of an ivy-covered trellis in Aspen, Colorado. Immigrants Abraham and Miriam (Mary) Kobey began their life in Colorado in Central City. The devout couple became vegetarians for a time while living there because kosher meat transported from Denver often arrived spoiled. After they moved to Denver, Abraham worked as a rabbi and sofer, or scribe, and Miriam became a highly respected midwife, often performing her services free for poor women.  Read more »

Portrait of Tillye Shulman (Levy) at Age Two

Tillye Shulman Levy, shown here at age two at the Shulman family home in Central City in 1897, became one of Denver's most active Jewish volunteers in the area of social welfare.

Children playing on swings at the National Home for Jewish Children

William R. Blumenthal, fundraiser, stands (at left) with 37 children on the playground of the National Home for Jewish Children in Denver near 19th Avenue and Lowell Boulevard in Denver, Colorado. Children pictured include Dan Justman, Sara Appel, Fred Vean, Fanny Barret, Doris Greenstein, Joey Barret, Mildred Vean, Rachel Passman, and Benny Passman.  Read more »

Sewing Class at the National Home for Jewish Children

A group of girls learn to sew during a class at the National Home for Jewish Children at Denver. The National Home for Jewish Children at Denver's history began in 1907 as the Denver Sheltering Home for Jewish Children, which was a refuge for lower-income children whose parents were being treated for tuberculosis, or had passed away from tuberculosis. In 1928 the institution changed names to the National Home for Jewish Children in Denver.  Read more »

Children at the Jewish Sheltering Home in Denver

A group of children sit in front of the Denver Sheltering Home at 19th Street and Julian Street in Denver, Colorado. The Sheltering Home began as a home for the children of tuberculosis patients who came to the sanatoriums in Denver. The Denver Sheltering Home later became the National Asthma Center. The original building was destroyed by fire in 1914. The 36 children living in the home at the time were taken in by neighborhood families until a new building could be erected.  Read more »

Boys Milking a Tuberculin-Tested Cow

Sammy and Irving Israel milk a tuberculin-tested cow. The boys were summertime volunteers in the care of the National Home for Jewish Children at Denver, which later became part of the National Jewish Hospital.

Click here to view this image in the Peak Digital Beck Archives Photograph Collection

Out-Patient Clinic of the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society

Men, women and children wait in the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society (JCRS) out-patient clinic. Six nurses in the room attend to the patients. One boy is weighed by a nurse. The JCRS was a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients that was founded in 1904 by a group of immigrant Jewish workingmen along with the support of several leading physicians and rabbis in Denver, Colorado. It was located on West Colfax Avenue just outside of Denver.  Read more »